Get to Know the Four Major Segments of Your Spine

The human spine is typically subdivided into three distinctive regions: the cervical spine, the thoracic spine and the lumbar spine. The fourth region, the sacral spine, is usually considered part of the pelvis.

A series of complex nerves, vessels, bones and joints also comprise the spine. Because the spinal column itself is the information highway of your entire body, even the smallest disturbance to these spinal systems can cause pain, discomfort, neurological problems or other adverse health outcomes.

At Ideal Spine, we recognize chiropractic medicine as the treatment of the spine using a number of techniques, including physical manipulation. Because the spinal column is such an integral part of the body, treating it allows chiropractors to implement a holistic approach to healthcare that addresses symptoms at their root.

It’s important to have a thorough understanding of the spine and its distinctive regions in order to seek out the best or provide the best possible chiropractic care.

Breaking down each section of the spine

There are a number of illnesses and dysfunctions that can strike the spine. The region of the spine that’s affected will typically outline how the illness in question manifests itself. For instance, illnesses or dysfunctions affecting the cervical spine are more likely to cause headaches, neck strain, or neurological problems.

Issues in the thoracic spine, meanwhile, will affect vital organs and blood and nerve flow. For instance, compressed nerves in the thoracic spine can cause patients to suffer from a lack of hand motion or degeneration of thumb muscles. Thoracic compressions can also restrict blood flow to the extremities, resulting in discoloration of the hands.

Lumbar dysfunctions are more likely to manifest as radiating lower back pain. Lumbar illness and dysfunction are most commonly associated with work or trauma-related sources.

The sacral spine, meanwhile, can cause leg pain and pelvic pain if it’s affected by herniation or other dysfunctions.

Getting to know vertebrae and discs

The spine is comprised of a complex series of parts that include vertebrae and disc.

The vertebrae are the bones themselves. Depending on their location in your back, the vertebrae are either interlocking or are fused together. Vertebrae consist of a several parts, including the spinal canal – this is what the spinal column travels through.

Discs, meanwhile, consist of a hard, outer exterior called an annulus and a soft, mush inside called the nucleus. When a disc is ruptured because of trauma or repetitive motion, the nucleus pushes itself out through the annulus and becomes squished between vertebrae or discs. This is called herniation and is usually accompanied by extreme pain or a loss of sensation.

Chiropractors put it all together

Chiropractors are capable of treating a range of spinal-related conditions, including disc herniation and more. Through the realignment of the spine and careful consideration of the affiliated nerves and muscles, chiropractors aim to affect positive wellness through targeted solutions, starting with the spine itself.

Ideal Spine is a trusted provider of chiropractic training. We help practitioners improve the way that they treat patients; we are proud to be on the cutting-edge of chiropractic care. Visit our website today to learn more about our training programs, or to find a practitioner near you who is knowledgeable in the Chiropractic BioPhysics (CBP) methodology.

Chiropractic BioPhysics® corrective care trained Chiropractors are located throughout the United States and in several international locations. CBP providers have helped thousands of people throughout the world realign their spine back to health, and eliminate a source of chronic back pain, chronic neck pain, chronic headaches and migraines, fibromyalgia, and a wide range of other health conditions. If you are serious about your health and the health of your loved ones, contact a CBP trained provider today to see if you qualify for care. The exam and consultation are often FREE. See www.CBPpatient.com for providers in your area.