Kissing Spine Syndrome: Romantic Name, Painful Result

A kiss is a gesture of love or affection when it’s shared between two people, but if the elements of your spine begin to “kiss,” it’s sure to be anything but romantic. Although most back pain tends to be attributed to inflammation or degeneration of the spinal vertebrae, discs, muscles, and nerves, there are many other parts of the spine that can cause problems for you as you age. One of these problems may be kissing spine syndrome.

If you begin experiencing pain that worsens when you arch your back, speak with a chiropractor trained in Ideal Spine’s Chiropractic BioPhysics (CBP) approach. Through physical examinations and imaging, you may discover that your spine is experiencing this often-underdiagnosed condition.

What is a kissing spine?

When most people think of the spine and the potential problems that can accumulate there, they tend to think first about the spinal vertebrae and the discs between them. However, your spine has other components, too, including the spinous processes – thin segments of bone that project off the back of each vertebrae.

Kissing spine syndrome, also known as Baastrup’s syndrome, Baastrup’s disease, or interspinous bursitis, occurs when these spinous processes move close together and touch, or “kiss.” Pain and inflammation can be triggered by this occurrence.

Kissing spine syndrome is believed to develop as a result of degenerative changes in the spine, particularly those related to aging. As vertebral discs break down, it can cause the spinous processes to move closer together and touch. The problem typically develops in the lumbar spine, but it can also occur in the neck.

The most notable symptom of kissing spine syndrome is back that worsens when you touch or arch your back. If you slump forward or round your back, the pain may diminish.

Additionally, when the spinous processes touch, they can begin to wear each other down, which may lead to other forms of degeneration in the spine. Over time, kissing spine disease may lead to secondary problems, including neurological conditions caused by nerve compression in the spine.

The condition is most common in older adults, due to the natural wear and tear on their spines. However, younger people, particularly athletes, can develop it, as well. Poor posture, obesity, and spinal injury are additional risk factors for this syndrome.

Diagnosing the condition typically involves a physical exam and imaging scans to confirm that at least two spinous processes are touching.

A chiropractic approach to kissing spines

One potential treatment method for kissing spines syndrome is chiropractic care. Through manipulations, stretches, and exercises, your chiropractor may be able to help you manage pain caused by both degenerative disc disease and kissing spine syndrome.

Spinal decompression techniques may be instrumental in opening up your spinal segments and making it less likely that the spinous processes will touch each other. Manipulations may be useful in facilitating proper joint mobility and potentially alleviating inflammation. Physical therapy-style exercises and stretches may also help stretch the spine and its supportive tissues to minimize pain.

If you’re experiencing neck or lower back pain, contact one of the spinal experts trained by Ideal Spine to begin your treatment plan. Through our non-invasive chiropractic approach, we may be able to provide long-term pain management and spinal correction for life-long comfort.

Chiropractic BioPhysics® corrective care trained Chiropractors are located throughout the United States and in several international locations. CBP providers have helped thousands of people throughout the world realign their spine back to health, and eliminate a source of chronic back pain, chronic neck pain, chronic headaches and migraines, fibromyalgia, and a wide range of other health conditions. If you are serious about your health and the health of your loved ones, contact a CBP trained provider today to see if you qualify for care. The exam and consultation are often FREE. See www.CBPpatient.com for providers in your area.